Watching from Within the White (Flower Friday)

As is so often the case with me, I was so focused on getting a clear, closeup shot of this white Lisianthus that it wasn’t until I’d downloaded my photos that I noticed the two balls within.

It was as if there was a pair of green eyeballs looking up at me. In retrospect I’m rather glad that I didn’t notice them earlier, they’re a tad freaky!

 

 

 

 

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Dusty Rose (Flower Friday)

When I photographed this beautiful rose bud it was far from being dusty. It was so fresh and so fragrant, but through the miracle of modern technology, and just a little tweaking, it’s true self has been concealed.

This is what happens when you combine phone apps and waiting of an afternoon at the school for your children… tweaked up flowers!

 

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Awash in Pink (Flower Friday)

Having read a blog post a couple of days ago by Emily Carter Mitchell – Nature & Wildlife Photography regarding the various apps she was currently using for editing her phone photos, within moments I’d downloaded them also.😂

Thank you Emily – as you can see, DistressFX is already a firm favourite!

 

 

 

Sunflower Wannabee (Friday Flowers)

Last month when friend’s came to stay the night, they brought with them a beautiful bouquet of flowers that included these wonderfully bright yellow daisies.

Daisies are always so cheerful and the very best part, their longevity is awe-inspiring. The sunshine within them seemingly allows them to live on for week after week!

 

 

 

 

Christening White (Friday Flowers)

It’s hard to say if this is a white spider-mum or on seeing the green towards the centre, if this could actually be an albino spider-mum. If there is such a thing, lol.

Regardless of the answer, it’s still a very beautiful bloom!

 

 

 

 

Dusty Centres (Flower Friday)

Not often do I come across fresh Lisianthus when I’m out and about but rest assured, when I do, I snaffle them as quickly and as gently as I possibly can!

The colours of these flowers are so muted and pretty, whilst the petals appear so delicate they look like they were made out of tissue paper!

 

 

 

 

Bon-bons for Bears (Flower Friday)

You know it’s spring when the bright yellow of the Skunk Cabbage, also known as the Skeena Lily, begins appearing in any areas where it’s wet and boggy.

According to dear-old-Wiki the Skunk Cabbage flowers attracts flies and midges whilst the roots are food for bears, eating them after hibernating as a laxative or cathartic. The plant was used by indigenous people as medicine for burns and injuries.